CoE report: Funds for judiciary in Slovenia above EU average


Slovenia allocated EUR 89.7 per inhabitant for the justice system in 2016, which compares to the European average of EUR 64.5. Azerbaijan spends the least on the judiciary (EUR 7.8), while Switzerland is the biggest spender (EUR 214.8).

Slovenia ranks fifth in terms of the share of GDP used up by the justice system. At 0.47% of GDP, it ranks only behind Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia and Moldova.

On the other hand, it is close to the European average in terms of the share that court fees represent in the judiciary's budget. In Slovenia they represent 18%, one point below the average.

The report says that the Slovenian per-capita budget for legal aid, at EUR 1.5, is among the lowest in CoE countries and compares to the average of EUR 6.96. Spending ranges from just six cents per inhabitant in Azerbaijan to EUR 36.21 in Sweden.

The picture is mixed when it comes to court staff.

Slovenia has 42.6 justices per 100,000 inhabitants, slightly more than twice the European average, and 83 lawyers per 100,000 inhabitants, which compares to the European average of 162.

Azerbaijan has 9 lawyers per 100,000 inhabitants, while Cyprus leads the list with 425 lawyers.

As for prosecutors, Slovenia is close to the European average of 12 prosecutors per 100,000 inhabitants.

In terms of gender equality, women are better represented in most branches of the judicial system than in Europe on average.

In 2016, 79% of judges in Slovenia were women, which compares to the European average of 53%. The figure stood at 68% for prosecutors (European average stands at 53%), 45% for lawyers (40%) and at 59% for notaries public (54%).

However, the picture is the opposite in law enforcement, which is dominated by men: the share of women stood at just 11%, far below the European average of 43%.

The report, compiled by CoE's European Commission for the Efficiency of Justice (CEPEJ), comprises data from 2016 from 45 of the 47 members of the organisation (excluding Lichtenstein and San Marino).