Foreign minister starting three-day visit to India

Ljubljana/New Delhi – Foreign Minister Anže Logar will start a three-day visit to India on Monday to meet with his Indian counterpart Subrahmanyam Jaishankar and take part in the Raisina Dialogue. He is also expected to hold talks with Indian President Narendra Modi, the Foreign Ministry said.

Logar will participate in Raisina Dialogue, an annual international forum discussing foreign policy issues in New Delhi, as a panellist of a round table debate on the relations between security and economic interests in Europe and the Indo-Pacific region.

The debate, which is also to feature Norwegian Foreign Minister Anniken Huitfeldt, former Australian PM Tony Abbott, Indian Foreign Ministry Secretary Sanjay Verma and director general of the German Foreign Ministry Petra Sigmund, has been organised in cooperation with the Bled Strategic Forum, the ministry said.

Logar will hold several bilateral meetings in India and attend a cultural event hosted by the Slovenian Embassy in New Delhi to mark 30 years of Slovenian-Indian diplomatic relations.

Logar stressed the importance of India as the largest global democracy in the Indo-Pacific region and called for a strong strategic partnership between the EU and India at last year’s Raisina Dialogue.

He also pointed to the importance of the Slovenian Koper port for India’s transport and economic connections with Europe.

India is an important strategic partner of Slovenia and the EU, Prime Minister Janez Janša said in an interview with the Indian newspaper The Economic Times in January. He said India was the second most important partner of Slovenia in Asia.

Trade between the country reached EUR 339.62 million in 2020.

ICT, especially electronics and software, was highlighted as one of the most promising areas for cooperation between the countries. Since Slovenian companies excel in environmental technologies, they can offer solutions and equipment to the Indian economy to make drinking and process water, and for cleaning of waste waters and soil, Janša said.

Slovenian companies can also offer farm machines, production engineering and equipment, and warehouses and logistic solutions, he said in the interview, which was published on the website of the government.