Government proposes much lower fines for speeding

Ljubljana – The government adopted changes to the road traffic rules act that significantly lower fines for speeding, which according to Infrastructure Minister Jernej Vrtovec will be comparable at the EU level. The minister believes more effort should be invested in prevention and control.

In line with the changes, divers who exceed the speed limit by up to 10 km/h in an area where speed is limited to 50 km/h would pay a EUR 40 fine.

Those exceeding the limit by 10-20 km/h would earn a EUR 120 fine plus three penalty points, instead of the current fine of EUR 250 plus three penalty points.

The fine for exceeding the limit by between 20 and 30 km/h would be EUR 250 plus five penalty points.

Presenting the changes to the press on Wednesday, Infrastructure Minister Jernej Vrtovec said that a new penalty would be introduced for exceeding the speed limit by between 30 and 40 km/h – a EUR 500 fine and seven penalty points.

Those who exceed the speed limit by between 40 and 50 km/h would pay a EUR 750 and nine penalty points would be added to their driving record.

Fines for speeding in the areas where speed is limited to 90 km/h and on motorway and expressways would also be lowered.

Speeding in the areas where speed is limited to 30 km/h of up to 10 km/h would come with a EUR 40 fine, of between 10 and 20 km/h with a EUR 130 fine, and of between 20 and 30 km/h with a EUR 500 fine plus seven penalty points.

Those exceeding the limit by 30 km/h or more in the low speed areas would pay a EUR 1,200 fine and get stripped of their driving licence.

“Personally, I’m an advocate of lower fines for speeding as … I think there is no correlation between high fines and fatal traffic accidents,” said Vrtovec, adding that effort should be invested in prevention and traffic control.

“Under this proposal, our fines will finally be comparable at the European level,” he said, pointing to neighbouring Austria, where fines are even lower.

The proposed changes also include the possibility to turn right at a red light at crossroads with good visibility and elsewhere where this is possible. “These crossroads will be properly marked, and traffic flow will certainly be better.”

Electric scooters will be defined as light motor vehicles and will be permitted to be driven on bicycle lanes or along the right edge of the road, as is the case for bicycles or mopeds.

“On the other hand, electric scooters will be prohibited on areas reserved for pedestrians,” Vrtovec said, adding that only persons aged 14 and older would be permitted to drive them. Those aged 18 and older would need to wear helmets.

The minister also said that those using their mobile phone while driving would however pay a higher fine, but did not specify.

The ministry had proposed increasing the fine from EUR 120 to EUR 250 plus three penalty points.