SAB party adopts new programme

Ljubljana – The opposition Alenka Bratušek Party (SAB) adopted a new programme on Saturday. The 15-point platform revolves around the welfare state supported by a strong economy, democracy and respect for the rule of law.

“Everything we do, we do for the people and their future,” Party leader Alenka Bratušek said in her address to the delegates.

SAB, which describes itself as a social-liberal party, has put youths and pensioners at the top of its agenda.

It says pensioners deserve decent pensions, good long-term care and free mobility.

For youths, they advocate housing assistance with 500 new flats nationwide annually, simpler renting, and a universal basic income for those aged 18-25.

Another major segment of the programme deals with public healthcare, which the party says must be accessibly to all under equal terms. They advocate a clear division between public and private providers.

This should be supported by a strong and innovative economy, a friendly business environment open to domestic and foreign investors, fair taxation, and better corporate social responsibility.

The platform says strategically important state-owned companies must remain in state ownership.

Outside their core policies, they advocate sustainable public finances and sustainable development, as well as a stable national security system that will “support a peaceful policy underpinned by neighbourly relations”.

The party wants to develop the common European security and defence policy and plans to advocate the development of “additional collective-security mechanisms” in NATO. They say Slovenia should regain leadership in Western Balkans.

The chapter on foreign policy states Slovenia should advocate a “free, secure and just EU,” a stronger common foreign policy making the EU a stronger global player, continued EU enlargement, and a common approach to border protection.

The chapter on democracy and rule of law singles out respect for the principles of rule of law and protection of human rights and freedoms.

Bratušek said the party was aware it is difficult to work in present-day circumstances, but noted that she had already led the government once.

“My experience shows that people understand the difficult situation and are ready to cooperate, to understand the government when it must take difficult decisions, but only if someone explains to them why a certain measure is needed.”

The delegates – just over 300 – were also addressed by representatives of sister parties in Renew Europe including Luxembourg Prime Minister Xavier Bettel, Estonian Prime Minister Kaja Kallas and former Italian Prime Minister Enrico Letta.